SF March: Castro, Mission, Civic Center

13 11 2016

Photos taken in San Francisco on Wednesday, November 9, 2016.  Collective grief, anger, passion, but without the trauma of violent aggression.  No smashy-smashy, no arrests, no confrontations.

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#FireKatehi Day 7: Protesters march to her House amidst growing Support

17 03 2016

fox40Fox 40: UC Davis Protesters March to Chancellor’s House

When Fox 40 tried to get Chancellor Katehi to come outside for an interview, she refused and sent her provost instead, who refused in turn to comment on Katehi’s controversial board seats or how she personally benefited from them.  From Fox 40:

Protester Bernadette Fox had a strong reaction to the provost commenting Wednesday night instead of the chancellor.

“I think it’s a smart move on their part given the chancellor’s history of mishandling things. It’s clear to them it would have been embarrassing,” said Fox, a fourth-year UC Davis student double-majoring in international relations and gender studies.

#FireKatehi now has its own very active Facebook page, Twitter @FireKatehi, and wordpress blog.

Their blog features a lengthy and growing list of statements of support, daily news coverage, and more.  Rumor has it #FireKatehi will be on Democracy Now! soon…

#FireKatehi wordpress blog (click here to visit)

#FireKatehi wordpress blog (click image to visit)





#FireKatehi Sit-in at UC Davis Chancellor’s office

14 03 2016
#FireKatehi Sit-In

#FireKatehi protestors explain their position in words and song (Sacramento Bee)

Students at the University California, Davis, began a sit-in last Friday at Chancellor Linda Katehi’s office in Mrak Hall.  Katehi has thus far refused to meet with students.

On 2/22/16, Katehi was appointed to the board of a for-profit college that is under federal investigation for false advertising, and received $70,000 for her services.  She was forced to resign the position on 3/1/16 under pressure from a state assemblyman and consumer advocacy groups.  Katehi also failed to follow University of California policy requiring chancellors to have their service on outside boards approved in advance by the 10-campus system’s president.

Katehi also received $420,000 in cash and stock over three years from her seat on the board of textbook publisher Wiley & Sons.  All this in addition to her annual UC chancellor’s salary of $424,000.

Only since she got caught has she offered to donate $200,000 of the $420,000 from Wiley towards the students.

Katehi has a track record of ethical controversies preceding her tenure at Davis (video) (3/8/16)  This is the same Katehi that presided over the pepper spray incident in 2011 that led faculty to call for her resignation.

Why would a highly-compensated chancellor of a public university join the board of a private for-profit college under federal investigation, especially given the connection between for-profit colleges and the student debt crisis? Why would she take a lucrative board seat with a textbook publisher, given the outrageously high textbook prices that burden students?

Students want and deserve answers.

Katehi has remained in hiding, and instead, last night her subordinate issued an officious threat of disciplinary action.  UC president and former head of the Department of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano has already voiced her unwavering endorsement of Katehi, based in part on the neoliberal rationale of Katehi’s ability to fundraise.  The implication is that the importance of Katehi to corporate welfare far exceeds any concern over ethical failure, and that beyond a slap on the wrist, business will continue as morally bankrupt as usual.

So is the only problem then, from UCOP’s perspective, that Katehi is too good at fundraising for personal gain?

Follow the #FireKatehi story on Twitter @OccupyDavis2 , #FireKatehi and Facebook Occupy UC Davis.





happy holidays

26 12 2015

happy holidays





Standing Against Yellowface @ The MFA: “Kimono Wednesdays” Cancelled

9 07 2015

AAPI Activism shuts down “Kimono Wednesdays” at Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts.

Protesters display signs on June 23 in the Museum of Fine Arts Boston. The museum eventually canceled the 'Kimono Wednesday' event, which invited visitors to try on a replica kimono in front of Claude Monet's 'La Japonaise.' | AP / JOHN BLANDING / BOSTON GLOBE

Protesters display signs on June 23 in the Museum of Fine Arts Boston. The museum eventually canceled the ‘Kimono Wednesday’ event, which invited visitors to try on a replica kimono in front of Claude Monet’s ‘La Japonaise.’ | AP / JOHN BLANDING / BOSTON GLOBE (via Japan Times)

Stand Against Yellowface @ the MFA:

Follow Amber Ying on Twitter

HEADLINES

HuffPost:  Museum’s ‘Kimono Wednesdays’ Cancelled After Claims Of Racism

LA Times:  Boston art museum cancels kimono event after claims of racism

Japan Times:  Cries of racism prompt Boston art museum to cancel ‘Kimono Wednesdays’

BACKGROUND

MFA Kimono

Image and comment thread from the Museum of Fine Arts Boston Facebook page, post dated June 19, 2015. (via bigredandshiny.org)

BigRedAndShiny:  Demonstrators Protest Cultural Appropriation in MFA Galleries

Yellowface at the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, February 19, 2015.

Yellowface at the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, February 19, 2015.

Our Post on Yellowface at AAMSF (02/24/15):  Yellowface is Such a Drag

Of course, what would an AAPI protest be without a counterprotest on behalf of honorary white status:

Just a reminder that Orientalism is indeed integral to white supremacist structural racism (and no need to call it “neo” Orientalism, because after centuries of investment in this system of “knowledge,” it is liberal fantasy to believe it ever went away—case in point: the genealogy of East Asian studies at major US universities, aka “American Orientalism“).

Andrea Smith’s Three Pillars of White Supremacy (2010).

Andrea Smith’s Three Pillars of White Supremacy (2010).

Politics of Cultural Appropriation





Japanese American History: NOT for Sale?

15 04 2015
Estelle Ishigo. Oil on canvas, "disloyal" Japanese-Americans leave Heart Mountain for Tule Lake Segregation Center, California at Heart Mountain, Wyoming, September 21, 1943 Signed 20" x 24" Provenance: Private collection, Connecticut. Acquired from the collection of Allen Hendershott Eaton.

Estelle Ishigo. “Disloyal” Japanese-Americans leave Heart Mountain for Tule Lake Segregation Center, California at Heart Mountain, Wyoming, September 21, 1943.  Oil on canvas, 20″ x 24.”  From the collection of Allen Hendershott Eaton to be auctioned this Friday.

A watercolor of life at Heart Mountain during the winter by Estelle Ishigo, 1943.  Part of the Collection of Allen Hendershott Eaton to be auctioned this Friday.

Estelle Ishigo.  Japanese-American internees swimming in the irrigation canals at Heart Mountain, Wyoming, September 1943. Oil on canvas, 20 x 24 in.  Part of the Collection of Allen Hendershott Eaton to be auctioned this Friday.

Japanese American History: NOT for Sale – Facebook Page

Change.org Petition:

Petitioning David Rago Partner + Co-Director, 20th/21st C. Design Dept., Rago Auction House

Stop the April 17 Auction, Lots 1232-1255

This Friday, April 17, Rago Arts will auction off 450 historical crafts and artifacts made by Japanese Americans confined in 10 WWII concentration camps.

These items were given — not sold — to the original collector, Allen Eaton, because he wanted to display them in an exhibition that would help tell the story of the  incarceration of 120,000 innocent people, more than half of them children.  It is a betrayal of those imprisoned people who thought their gifts would be used to educate, not be sold to the highest bidder in a national auction, pitting families against museums against private collectors.  

Eaton opposed the incarceration and this sale goes against his intent for a public exhibition that received official support.

Please sign this petition to ask Rago Arts to remove Lots 1232-1255 and our cultural patrimony from the auction block. These items were not meant to be viewed in the privacy of a collector’s home and that a price tag should not be put on our cultural property. 

Satsuki Ina, Ph.D.

Petition Update:  Auction House Rejects Good Faith Discussions

They offered to give me things to the point of embarrassment, but not to sell them…

— Allen H. Eaton, 1952

Auction takes place Friday April 17

Help stop the Rago auction of Nikkei heritage property: Pull Lots 1232 – 1255
Rago Auction FB page
@RagoAuctions
‪#‎StopRago‬

Sign the Petition

MEDIA COVERAGE

The New York Times

International Examiner

KGO ABC7 News

CBS Sacramento

Sacramento Bee

Artnet

Rafu Shimpo

Artforum

One of twelve Sumi watercolor on paper views of Tule Lake War Relocation Center, California, ca. 1942 to be auctioned this Friday.  Unsigned, possibly by George T. Tamura

 





In This Week’s Retro-Racial News: Noose, N*****s, Lynching

5 04 2015

Among this week’s news headlines:

CBS News: Duke finds person responsible for hanging noose on campus, April 2, 2015

CBS News: Duke finds person responsible for hanging noose on campus, April 2, 2015

WashPost: University of South Carolina student suspended after racist photo goes viral, April 5, 2015

WashPost: University of South Carolina student suspended after racist photo goes viral, April 5, 2015

Guardian: Black woman's 'lynching' charge: an unsettling tactic to punish activism? April 5, 2015

Guardian: Maile Hampton’s ‘lynching’ charge: an unsettling tactic to punish activism? April 5, 2015

Retro-racial not Post-raciala noose on campus, a USC student caught snapchatting the N-word, and a 20-year old African American activist charged with felony lynching?

How is the person who hung the noose “taking responsibility,” as the CNN headline reads, by remaining nameless and faceless?

How do the official university rhetoric of intolerance of racial intolerance and quick explusions of overtly racist individual students and fraternities work together to disavow the anti-blackness that pervades American universities on a much deeper and more systematic structural level? (This includes the UC system (e.g. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7), where black student enrollment in 2010 was 3.6% at the undergraduate level and 2.7% at the graduate level).

How do laws supposedly originally conceived of to protect blacks from racist white vigilante violence get re-purposed to persecute Maile Hampton, a black activist at a protest against police killing black people?

How do we, as Common urges, “forget about the past as much as we can and let’s move from where we are now,” or simply “adapt,” as actor Isiah Washington suggests, when the specters of the past remain very much present, for example, in the expressions of young (white [and honorary white]) people and in the structural dehumanization of young blacks?

How does an approach of disavowal/respectability/accommodation bring where “we are now” that much closer to the racism that is constantly being disavowed?

What is truly at stake in this ongoing disavowal?








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